Orthopedic Splint Materials: Three Points to Consider When Choosing

When faced with a patient who requires a custom-made orthosis, choosing the right Orthopedic splint Materials might be difficult. You could be concerned with constructing the correct orthosis for the client's diagnosis, as well as ensuring that it fits well and is comfortable. You must also select the proper Orthopedic splint Materials – a step that will make your orthotic construction process a lot easier! Use these guidelines to help you choose the most comfortable and supportive Orthopedic splint materials for your patient.

 

Medical high polymer splints are manufactured of high polymer polyurethane and are a type of high polymer product. It's an external fixation device for fractures, sprains, and strains, and it's also an excellent fixation splint for usage before detumescence. Polyurethane for medical application was shown to be free of toxicity, distortion, and local irritation in animal tests as well as acute and chronic toxicological tests. It is appropriate for the treatment of fracture patients as well as orthopedics.


 

Understand the Terms for Low-Temperature Orthopedic Splint Materials

 

When we understand what makes each material distinctive, selecting the right low-temperature Orthopedic Splint Materials becomes simple. 

 

  • Rigidity: Rigidity refers to a material's strength. Big orthoses, particular diagnoses (such as high tone), and orthoses that produce large forces all require great stiffness.

 

  • Memory: After being stretched, a material's memory refers to its ability to return to its original size and shape. This is a crucial idea when remolding the splint on a regular basis is required, such as in serial orthotic production. Memory improves the material's cost-effectiveness. When working with these materials, keep in mind that the orthosis must firm before being removed, or it will lose its shape quickly.

 

  • Bonding: The capacity of a substance to attach to itself or to other materials is referred to as bonding. Unless the coating is removed, coated materials will not bind. Non-coated materials have the potential to be extremely sticky. Coated materials may be easier to deal with since they can easily be remolded and reshaped.

 

  • Conformability: The capacity of a substance to attach to itself or to other materials is referred to as bonding. Unless the coating is removed, coated materials will not bind. Non-coated materials have the potential to be extremely sticky. Coated materials may be easier to deal with since they can easily be remolded and reshaped.

 

  • Elasticity: Elasticity, often known as stretch resistance, refers to how resistant a material is to being stretched when heated. To stretch the material with high resistance, you must operate slowly and steadily. Low resistance implies you'll have to work harder to keep the material under control.

 

Choose the Correct Thickness for the Patient's Size

The thickness of low-temperature Orthopedic splint Materials must be taken into account.  low-temperature Orthopedic splint Materials are typically available in four different thicknesses: 1/8", 3/32", 1/12", and 1/16". Smaller orthoses for the fingers and thumbs require thinner materials, such as 1/16" and 1/12". Larger orthoses may require thicker materials, such as 1/8" or 3/32". Thinner low-temperature Orthopedic splint Materials soften and harden faster than thicker materials, resulting in a shorter working period.


 

Examine the Orthopedic  Splint Materials

If you're not sure about a material's features and attributes, try a sample piece. To test your material, follow this easy guide:

 

  1. Place the sample in a pot of boiling water (140°F – 160°F).

 

  • Does the sample become transparent as it is remembered? If the answer is yes, the item will have memory.

 

  • Activation Time - How long does it take to become completely transparent?

 

  • Is it floatable in terms of weight? If so, this device will provide your patients with lightweight support.

 

  1. Remove the sample from the water.

  • Is the coating self-adhesive? Does it adhere to other surfaces?

 

  • Elasticity refers to how far something can be stretched before it tears or stops stretching.

 

  1. Over your flexed MCP joints, mold the material.

  • Working Time – How long can it be molded for?

  • The degree to which it conforms to the shape is referred to as conformability.

 

  1. Return the sample to the boiling water.

  • Does memory revert to its initial state?

  • Understanding the characteristics of each low-temperature material can help you choose the ideal material for the orthosis you're making.